Art Monk, Dave Casper Among Newly Enshrined In College Hall

Oneida Nation thanks Art Monk and Darrell Green

“You get to step back out into the forefront and say, ‘Hey, I wasn’t just a great professional athlete, but I also did some things in college that were worth being recognized.” MANZIEL: QB gets minor punishment Monk, Ty Detmer, Dave Casper, Charles Alexander, Art Shell and Jimmy Johnson were among 24 former players and coaches enshrined into the College Football Hall of Fame on Wednesday night. The hall has moved from South Bend, Ind., but the new building in downtown Atlanta is still under construction and scheduled to open in August 2014. Atlanta was hosting its first enshrinement ceremony in a hotel ballroom adjacent to what will be a 94,256-square foot museum that organizers believe will host 500,000 visitors each year. Atlanta is home to the Southeastern Conference championship game, the Chick-fil-A Bowl and the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Classic that this year matches up No. 1 Alabama against Virginia Tech on Saturday. Other hall inductees included Steve Bartkowski, Jonathan Ogden, Phillip Fulmer and R.C. Slocum. Monk was a first-round draft pick for Washington in 1980, helped the Redskins win three Super Bowls and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. MUST-SEE GAMES: For each Saturday of 2013 season For Alexander, getting enshrined in the college hall carried deep meaning.

Five Years Ago: Redskins Art Monk and Darrell Green Enshrined into Hall of Fame

Regardless, that was clearly seen as a victory by those who want the name changed. They have joined a growing movement around what should be a universally accepted idea: that denigrating this countrys indigenous people by promoting ugly stereotypes is unacceptable in the 21st century, Halbritter further said in the statement. As the representative of one of those indigenous peoples, I want to thank and commend Mr. Monk and Mr. Green for their leadership just as I did the children of Cooperstown. Together, they are teaching this country a critical lesson about the ideals of mutual respect and inclusion. This all also made it into Syracuse Post Standard columnist Bud Poliquins text, with the writer saying Monks usual reticence needs to be considered .

Art Monk, now a College Football Hall-of-Famer, talks a whole lot more than he used to

(Doug Mills / Associated Press / July 23, 2013) By Sam Farmer July 23, 2013, 9:35 a.m. Darrell Green and Art Monk, both Washington Redskins Hall of Famers, say the franchise should consider changing its nickname to one that isnt offensive to Native Americans. In an interview Tuesday with WTOP radio radio in Washington, the former stars voiced opinions that run counter those of Redskins owner Daniel Snyder, who has said hell never change the name, and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell . [If] Native Americans feel like Redskins or the Chiefs or [another] name is offensive to them, then who are we to say to them ‘No, it’s not’? said Monk, adding a name change should be seriously considered. Echoed Green: It deserves and warrants conversation because somebody is saying, ‘Hey, this offends me. Ten members of Congress sent a letter in May to every NFL team, calling for the Redskins to change their name. Goodell responded with a letter to Congress defending the nickname as a unifying force that stands for strength, courage, pride and respect. ALSO:

College HOF enshrines 24

When he’s finished with this dodge, his cleats won’t be shipped off to some museum somewhere; he will. There was King Tut. There was Cardiff’s Giant. There will be Art Monk, the only receiver in Redskins history to have back-to-back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons. And here’s why: After never missing a practice or a game because of injury during his career at Syracuse University, and accounting for nearly 4,000 yards in Orange offense along the way, he became a first-round draft choice of the Redskins in 1980. That amounted to not merely man-bites-dog news. It was man-wags-tail-afterward stuff, too. You see, in the 11 years preceding Monk’s going to Washington, the ‘Skins had treated No.

Darrell Green, Art Monk Discuss Redskins Name Controversy

“What I did in college does get overshadowed, so something like this is great,” Monk said. “You get to step back out into the forefront and say, `Hey, I wasn’t just a great professional athlete, but I also did some things in college that were worth being recognized.” Monk, Ty Detmer, Dave Casper, Charles Alexander, Art Shell and Jimmy Johnsonwere among 24 former players and coaches enshrined into the College Football Hall of Fame on Wednesday night. The hall has moved from South Bend, Ind., but the new building in downtown Atlanta is still under construction and scheduled to open in August 2014. Atlanta was hosting its first enshrinement ceremony in a hotel ballroom adjacent to what will be a 94,256-square foot museum that organizers believe will host 500,000 visitors each year. Atlanta is home to the Southeastern Conference championship game, the Chick-fil-A Bowl and the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Classic that this year matches up No. 1 Alabama against Virginia Tech on Saturday. Other hall inductees included Steve Bartkowski, Jonathan Ogden, Phillip Fulmer and R.C. Slocum. Monk was a first-round draft pick for Washington in 1980, helped the Redskins win three Super Bowls and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Darrell Green, Art Monk urge Redskins to consider name change

(Winslow Townson / AP) Best 2013 Sports Photos Utah’s Jason Washburn celebrates after blocking a shot by California in overtime during a Pac-12 men’s tournament NCAA college basketball game, Thursday, March 14, 2013, in Las Vegas. Utah won 79-69. (Julie Jacobson / AP) Best 2013 Sports Photos San Diego Padres shortstop Tyler Stubblefield misses a ground ball hit by Kansas City Royals’ Orlando Calixte for a double in the ninth inning in an exhibition spring training baseball game Friday, March 15, 2013, in Surprise, Ariz. (Gregory Bull / AP) Best 2013 Sports Photos Miami’s Kenny Kadji (35) tries to go over Illinois’ D.J. Richardson for a shot during the first half of a third-round game of the NCAA college basketball tournament Sunday, March 24, 2013, in Austin, Texas. (David J. Phillip / AP) Best 2013 Sports Photos Nathalie Pechalat and Fabian Bourzat, of France, perform during a practice session for the World Figure Skating Championships, Tuesday, March 12, 2013, in London, Ontario. (Darron Cummings / AP) Best 2013 Sports Photos Alexa Scimeca and Chris Knierim, of the United States, react as they watch their scores during the pairs free program at the World Figure Skating Championships Friday, March 15, 2013, in London, Ontario.

Redskins Legend Art Monk Enters College Football Hall of Fame

Pre-Game Playlist: Stevie Johnson

Detmer, a former BYU quarterback, won the 1990 Heisman Trophy. Ogden won the 1995 Outland Trophy as UCLAs left tackle. Armstrong left Purdue in 1972 as the Big Tens career leading rusher. Manning, a former Mississippi quarterback and father to NFL star QBs Peyton and Eli Manning, is recovering from back surgery. Fulmer (led Tennessee to 1998 national title) and Slocum (Texas A&Ms career-leading winner in now-defunct Southwest Conference) were enshrined as coaches. Shell was one of seven inductees from FBS or lower division schools Washington University linebacker Shelby Jordan, Westminster (Pa.) quarterback Joe Micchia, Ithaca College fullback Jeff Wittman and coaches Frank Cignetti of West Virginia and Indiana (Pa.), Boots Donnelly of Austin Peay and Middle Tennessee State and Jess Dow of Southern Connecticut State. ( Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

To see the magnitude of all of this, and all of you, its been something amazing, said Monk. Former Redskins receivers Ricky Sanders and Gary Clark look on as Art Monk is inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2008. Photo by Mike Frandsen. Former Skins receivers Gary Clark and Ricky Sanders, who along with Monk made up the Posse, stood up and proudly cheered on Monk. By the way, Clark was also a superb receiver, and his numbers stack up well against other Hall of Fame receivers such as Michael Irvin of the Dallas Cowboys . In 11 seasons, Clark averaged 64 catches and 962 yards per year and scored 65 touchdowns. Meanwhile, in 12 seasons, Irvin averaged 63 catches and 992 yards per year, and also had 65 touchdowns. Clark’s fiery demeanor often was in contrast to his more subdued teammates, and he played an important role in firing up the team and fans. But mostly, he was an excellent receiver, a deep threat who was one of the best in the NFL from the mid-1980s to the early 1990s.

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